Posts in Knowledge
Maintaining Personal Identity As We Age

Identity can be defined in a social or a personal context. Social identity considers how people see or define themselves in relation to a social group. It can also be how others see us.  Personal identity is based on the unique attributes distinguishing individuals from others. 

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Congratulations Warrigal!

Whilst Warrigal won the ACSA National Award for Aged Care Provider of the Year in 2018, did you know they were awarded the Excellence in Sustainability Award in 2017 and are the first aged care provider to be Gold partner in NSW’s Sustainability Advantage Recognition Scheme?  Read on to find out more about how Warrigal committed to achieving real environmental improvements!

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Who Nose About This?

Anna Wolf and Alex Bahar-Fuchs from the University of Melbourne recently wrote an article in The Conversation titled “An impaired sense of smell can signal cognitive decline, but ‘smell training’ could help” to explain that as we get older, we can experience problems with the sense of smell. 

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Granny Does Graffiti!

A program in Colorado called ‘Granny Does Graffiti’ arose from the concept that both street art and memory are fleeting.  Programs such as these explore memories and pathways in the brain for creativity and engagement.

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Remember Me?

As we age, we can experience memory lapses and forget things from time to time.  However, this is different to the persistent and progressive memory loss associated with dementia.

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Arts on Prescription

Arts on Prescription was a HammondCare led and Australian government funded evidence based program informed by similar initiatives in the UK.  This uses a participatory art approach alongside traditional health care approaches to improve the physical and mental well-being of older people.  It is different to diversional therapy.  Read on to find out more and to get your copy of the free guide on using Arts on Prescription in aged care!

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Music through the decades

Music means so much to so many people. Whether it is through iPods, smart phones, CD’s, radios or vinyls people can listen to music from sun up to sun down and from birth to as they pass from this life.  Music has been identified as contributing to autobiographical memories which enables us to make judgements about ourselves and others. A link has been identified between working memory for musical stimuli and for verbal stimuli which led to the conclusion that the process of learning music improves the learning of verbal tasks.  Read on for more about music memory and to test your recall of popular songs about memory from each decade!



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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Bibliotherapy, What is it and how can it help?

Bibliotherapy, simply put, it is the use of literature to help people deal with their ailments. Information is emerging on the positive impact it may have on the wellbeing of people living with dementia. Internationally recognised, bibliotherapy involves the provision of carefully selected and evaluated books (fiction and non-fiction) and poetry. 

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Inner Peace

A recent study showed important components of design which can support the well-being of the elderly to include a variety of spaces, comfort and safety. This led to discussion in the office on ‘calmness’ and various ways this can be achieved. What better source of inspiration than the poets, leaders and brave people of yesteryear?

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
The wisdom of the ages

Seek the wisdom of the ages but look at the world through the eyes of a child (R.Wild)

Many societies have changed over time with fewer families living near or spending time with older family members. 

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Grab rail, hand rail or rail by any other name!

Rails assist with balance, support and transfers so the selecting the right product for your needs as well ensuring compliance with standards such as AS1428 is important. There are different types and applications….

Horizontal rails are effective for side transfers from wheelchairs onto toilets and can provide some forearm support during sit to stand transfers whereas the vertical or angled rails provide support throughout the sit to stand transfer. Often both are present. Either horizontal or vertical can be installed in showers depending on need and position of any existing fixtures.

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Let there be light… but not glare!

We have all experienced the uncomfortable or even debilitating effects of glare.  Too often we step out of a darker house into the bright outdoors or we are driving to reach the top of a hill or crest and get blinded by the full sun! Glare is a visual sensation caused by too much brightness and can be termed disability glare or discomfort glare.

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Making Sense of the Senses.. Part Three

We learnt about the basic senses (sight, smell, taste, hearing and touch), internal senses (such as kinaesthetic, equilibrium, pressure, stretch) and some controversial ones such as passing of time and premonition in part one. The impact of ageing on these senses continued the theme in part two. We conclude in part three to show you how designing for the senses becomes so important!


Older people experience changes to vision, colour recognition and perception so you need to consider furniture and flooring selections accordingly.

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Making Sense of the Senses... Part Two

All of the eye structures change with ageing. By the time you turn 60, your pupils may decrease to about one third of the size they were when you were 20. The pupils may react more slowly in response to darkness or bright light. The lens becomes yellowed, less flexible, and slightly cloudy.

The sharpness of your vision gradually declines with difficulty focusing on close-up objects. Glare is tolerated less and you have trouble adapting to darkness or bright light.  Older people have reduced peripheral vision and experience difficulties differentiating colours – particularly blues.

Read on to find out what else changes as we age!

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Making Sense of the Senses... Part One

A ‘sense’ is defined as any system which consists of a group of sensory cell types which respond to specific stimuli, convert this to nerve signals which are carried to a particular part of the brain where the signals are received,  interpreted and turned into meaningful sensations.

A common understanding of our senses is that humans see, touch, smell taste and hear.  Modern neuroscience is challenging this and suggesting there might be up to 33 senses. This month we explore the basic and internal senses plus some controversial senses!

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Does Re-designing Workplaces Attract Staff?

Do funky design features lure skilled staff to your workplace? Not necessarily reports Libby Sanders. 

People are searching for quiet or time out spaces in the face of rising work related stress.  With up to 49% of the Australian workforce experiencing this situation, several organisations have recognised the need for zen-like zones and responded accordingly to support their staff to recover from cognitive fatigue and to reduce stress.  

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar
Do They Know It's Christmas?

Christmas can be a time of festivity, family gatherings, cheer and goodwill.  Equally it can be a time of stress, confusion and sadness. This can be said for all of us and not just older people or those living in aged care facilities. Selecting suitable gifts for a person living in residential care can be tricky so consider gifting sensory experiences – massages, manicures, pedicures or animal visits. Or even the most valuable gift of all – your time. 

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KnowledgeAmy Bosnar